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Watch Live: Falcon 9 Brings NASA’s New Marine Image Satellite into Space

November 21st – Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich, the latest satellite to monitor global sea level rise, will be brought into space by SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket on Saturday.

Takeoff from Vandenberg Air Force Base in Central California is scheduled for 12:17 EST.

NASA TV will provide a live launch broadcast, with coverage starting at 11:45 am.

If the weather on Saturday is uncooperative, additional launch windows will be available every few days next.

Sentinel-6 was developed by scientists and engineers from NASA, the European Space Agency, the European Organization for the Exploit of Meteorology, and NOAA.

The satellite contains three devices, including a state-of-the-art altimeter used to monitor sea level topography.

It also records atmospheric data such as temperature and humidity to improve weather forecasts, climate models, and hurricane tracking.

“It will be a new star in the sky, providing the best possible measurements of sea level rise, ocean waves and wind,” ESA’s Sentinel-6 mission scientist Craig Donlon said at a press conference on Friday. Stated.

Only a few minutes after the lift-off, the main stage is to cut the engine, separating the first and second stages. After separation, the second step in carrying the satellite payload is to ignite the booster.

The first stage of the reusable Falcon 9 will begin automatic boostback combustion to the launch site for propulsion landing.

According to NASA, “The first stage of the reusable Falcon 9 will begin automatic boostback combustion to the launch site for propulsion landing.”

Forty-five minutes after the first second stage engine burns, the second stage thruster is fired again and the payload is brought into a “parked” orbit. After a few minutes, the satellite will be released.

According to NASA, “the satellite will begin deploying solar panels approximately 1 hour and 7 minutes after launch, and will make its first contact approximately 25 minutes thereafter.”

The Sentinel-6 provides continuity to NASA’s 30-year effort to track its predecessor’s polar orbit and track sea level rise.

After a year of data analysis to ensure that the satellite and its equipment are functioning optimally, scientists will begin using Sentinel-6 data. All satellite measurements will be published.

The Sentinel-6 will eventually be replaced by the twin satellite Sentinel-6B, which will be launched in 2025.



Watch Live: Falcon 9 Brings NASA’s New Marine Image Satellite into Space

Source link Watch Live: Falcon 9 Brings NASA’s New Marine Image Satellite into Space

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