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Pushed by a pandemic, Amazon continues to hire without equality

During the summer, Amazon converted most of its 175,000 temporary workers to full-time employees, ending the additional wage increases for all workers. Since then, the wave of recruitment has continued.

Marc Wulfraat, founder of MWPVL International, a logistics consulting firm that tracks Amazon’s business, said the company has nearly tripled the number of US warehouses used for last mile deliveries this year. Delivery drivers are usually contractors, so Amazon does not disclose that number in its regulatory submissions.

“They have built their own UPS in the last few years,” Wulfraat said. “The pace of this change has never been seen before.”

Williams said Amazon has also built relationships with companies that are reducing staff, such as Uber, American Airlines and Marriott, to promote employment.

“We have dedicated enough groups to connect with organizations that are offending people, whether temporary or permanent,” she said. “This allowed us to hire a skilled, high-quality workforce and move it to Amazon on the right occasion quickly and easily.”

She says the effort is backed by 1,000 technology workers who create software for Amazon’s HR team, many build portals, and algorithms that automate recruitment. Future employees will be able to find, apply for and hire jobs completely online without having to talk to one person.

Williams said Amazon needs to think in the long run to grow this much. As a result, the company has already worked with kindergartens to establish a foundation for technical education, “the pipeline is ready as recruitment demand grows over the next decade,” she said.

Michael Corkery contributed a report from New York.

Pushed by a pandemic, Amazon continues to hire without equality

Source link Pushed by a pandemic, Amazon continues to hire without equality

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