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FDA Stops Use of Antibodies That Do Not Work Against Omicron | Health

Since early January, the US government has shipped enough of the two antibodies to treat more than 300,000 patients.

Both Regeneron and Lilly have previously announced that they are developing new antibodies that target Omicron.

This move occurs days after regulators have expanded their use of remdesivir, the first drug approved by COVID-19, to treat more patients.

On Friday, the FDA expanded its antiviral approvals to include early COVID-19 adults and children at high risk of hospitalization. Remdesivir was previously limited to inpatients.

An influential committee of federal experts has already recommended the use of infused medications to avoid hospitalization. The same guidelines from the National Institutes of Health panel do not recommend continued use of Lily and Regeneron antibody drugs as they are less effective against Omicron.

Still, many hospitals will face challenges in strengthening remdesivir treatment. When used on non-hospitalized patients, the drug should be infused three times in a row over a three-day period. That time-consuming process is not an option for many overcapacity hospitals facing staff shortages.

The FDA made a decision based on a study of 560 patients who showed that administration of remdesivir within 7 days of symptoms reduced hospitalization by nearly 90%. This study precedes the Omicron variant, but like other antivirals, remdesivir is expected to maintain its performance against the latest mutants.

FDA Stops Use of Antibodies That Do Not Work Against Omicron | Health

Source link FDA Stops Use of Antibodies That Do Not Work Against Omicron | Health

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